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10 Common Skiing Myths

Apr 1st 2016

Regardless of whether you have skied all your life or you are brand new to skiing, there is a lot of misinformation about skiing out there that you may not realize. Here are 10 common myths we hear about skiing:

MYTH: You should bend your knees while you ski.

This is not a safe way to ski. When you bend your knees and sit back, you become off-balance. You should bend at the ankles instead, which will cause your hips and knees to follow along and keep you centered.

MYTH: Lean forward while you ski.

Your goal when you ski should be to be centered. This way, you can use the whole ski, and your pivot point is directly under your foot.

MYTH: You should ski with your feet as close together as possible.

Again, the idea is to be as centered as possible. Keeping a wide stance keeps you balanced.

MYTH: Dig your edges in when it’s icy.

Actually, you need more balance. Digging in your edges will only throw you off balance.

MYTH: If there are tracks to follow, it's safe to ski off piste.

You do not know what equipment was used to make those tracks, or how experiences the skiers were. It is better not to take the risk.

MYTH: When you are skiing off piste, you should always lean back.

You should try to maintain a centred balance in order to control the skis under your feet. You should bring your skis closer together, bounce more, and stay centered.

MYTH: Wear thick, wool socks to keep your feet warm.

Socks that are thick will make you sweat more, which will become increasingly more uncomfortable as you cool down. It is better to wear thin socks that are not made of cotton, which retains moisture.

MYTH: Ski season ends in March.

Many people believe that ski season is over once March comes around. However, there is still plenty of snow to be had after that. Generally, ski resorts close not because they do not have the snow, but because they do not have the skiers.

MYTH: Trail ratings always accurately measure difficulty.

The trail ratings on trail maps are relative to the ski area and are not universal. Additionally, snow conditions also play a role in the difficulty of skiing in that area. For example, a double-black under 5 inches of fresh snow may be easier than a single-black full of rock-hard moguls.

MYTH: The fewer the trails, the smaller the ski area.

The number of trails can be skewed very easily. For example, some ski resorts take one trail and split it into upper and lower trails, turning one run into two. Additionally, their longest run is often not really what you would expect; it is sometimes a long catwalk that no one would actually want to ski all the way down.

When you need ski gear for to debunk these myths, trust Rocky Mountain Ski & Board to provide all the ski gear and accessories you need! Shop our selection today.